Bridge is something to crawl under: The day I mastered crane pose

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When I babysit my 3 year old niece and 4 year old nephew we do yoga together because
1. they’re interested and;
2. it keeps them occupied.
A few nights ago I was staying over at their house after a long day helping my aunt promote her business, Wilbertha’s treats, at a trade show.  I pulled out my mat to practice. They promptly sat crossed legged on the mat and asked if it was time to exercise. This meant my personal practice had just turned in to an interactive kids yoga class.
 
We started with a few deep breaths; inhaling through the nose, exhaling through the mouth.
 
Nephew: “It sounds like the wind”
Niece: “like the wind blowing through the tress”
Nephew: “I can do the tree. You put one leg on the other and put your arms up. Will we be doing the tree?”
Me: ” Yes, but not now. Let’s take a few more deep breaths.”
 
It continued like this until my nephew decided he needed to take pictures instead of practice.  I ended up with many pictures of random body parts. I have included some of the best ones in this post.
 
I have been working on my Bakasana for a while now. I just couldn’t get both feet off the ground at the same time. It finally happened during the following conversation:
Nephew: “What is this one?”
Me: “Crane. It’s a type of bird.IMG-20131109-00057
Niece (flapping her arms): “A bird says tweet tweet, tweet tweet.”
Me: “My legs aren’t touching!”
Both kids: “Do it again! Do it again!”
 
It turns out two curious kids were just what I needed to master the crane. Later during bridge the agreed that a bridge was something you crawled under and proceeded to crawl under my bridge several times while giggling.

Life is all about perspective. Sometimes we get attached to a certain mindset and are too stubborn to change, try new things or simply look at the same old thing with fresh eyes. I invite you to shake things up, try new things or try new ways of looking at old things. I never expected that the chatter of young minds would deepen my practice but it certainly did. What can you learn from young children?